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Still, its satisfaction ratings are no worse than other cheap ionization smoke detectors that are similar. Examples include 4. 1 stars following nearly 400 reviews at Amazon, for example, and a rating of 4. 5 stars following more than 320 reviews at Home Depot, where this smoke alarm is sold as the Code One 21010019. This is a single unit, and is sold under both the First Alert and BRK brands. It's also available in a two pack as the First Alert SA511CN2 3ST Est. $70, and that's the version that actually gets the most feedback. For example, at Amazon it earns a score of 4. 1 stars following more than 320 reviews. Wirecutter does not test the smoke alarm, and hence its evaluation isn't relied on in making our selection. That said, based on their own research, Doug Mahoney calls the SA511CN2 3ST the best basic smoke alarm.

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01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

109 and Wichita License No. 2015 36492; and, Virginia, , LLC DCJS License 11 7776; DPOR License 2705164725. Homelife Security and Automation $44. 99/mo. offer includes new Cox Homelife Security and Automation service plan for residential customers with new or current subscription to one or more of Cox video, Internet and/or phone service in select Cox service areas. Standalone plans Cox Homelife Security and Automation $54/99/mo. are also available. Choice of base equipment kit Preferred 2 window/door sensors, 1 motion sensor, and 1 HD camera or credit toward equipment purchase Homelife Security and Automation $250 included with 2 year service agreement. Unused equipment credit may not be redeemed or applied to other charges. Early termination fees apply with 2 year agreement.

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01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

"You change how you drive when you see a cop driving next to you. What if a cop shows up at your door and asks you for something?" Tajsar said. "Even if you're the biggest civil libertarian, you will feel compelled to turn that footage over. "Law enforcement requests are easy to reject in theory. In person, they're a bit more difficult. But this is the ecosystem Amazon is building. Most of us still associate Amazon with free shipping and VOD, but the company really wants a piece of the government action. Whatever it hasn't tied up in hosting and storage, it's looking to collect via surveillance tech. Amazon is selling as much facial recognition software as it can to law enforcement agencies despite recent controversies and now it's hoping its home products will attract more subsidized deployments. Local law enforcement provides the public with cheap or free doorbell cameras and swings by for the footage whenever needed. Who isn't going to feel obligated to hand this over to the cops when they come asking?As the EFF's Dave Maass points out, if cops wanted to outfit a ton of homes with surveillance cameras they could access at any time, there would be some pushback.